Motorheads share the love at car show

Event benefits Mercy’s incoming hospice patients

Mary Shinn/Durango Herald
Chip Alt examines the 1936 Dodge roadster that Myron Tolf built at the Durango Motor Expo on Main Avenue on Saturday. The Durango Old Car Club hosts the annual event. Rat rods, like this one, can be much cheaper to build than hot rods. Enlarge photo

Mary Shinn/Durango Herald Chip Alt examines the 1936 Dodge roadster that Myron Tolf built at the Durango Motor Expo on Main Avenue on Saturday. The Durango Old Car Club hosts the annual event. Rat rods, like this one, can be much cheaper to build than hot rods.

For years, Myron Tolf saw many of the same cars at the Durango Old Car Club’s show, and so for the last three, he’s built a custom roadster for the show.

The retired civil engineer worked on hot rods for years. But his recent projects have been rat rods, roadsters that use a conglomeration of parts from cars of different years.

Tolf has sold some of his creations and found the style resonates with those in their 50s and 60s.

“The weirder, the wilder, the better,” he said of rat rods.

Tolf started on the roadster for Saturday’s show in July with cab of a truck. From April 25 until Wednesday, he worked on the 1936 Dodge every day..

Saturday, he sat back in the shade with his wife, Louise, listening to his fellow car aficionados admire and critique his work.

Tolf’s car was among about 240 vehicles that lined Main Avenue on Saturday for the annual Durango Motor Expo.

Proceeds from the Durango Old Car Club event will benefit the first residents of Mercy Regional Medical Center’s new hospice center when it opens this fall, said Kay Jones, special events coordinator for Mercy Health Foundation. The club also plans to donate to the La Plata County Mounted Patrol, said Eliane Nobriga, a volunteer with the Expo.

Derek Stuart brought his everyday car, a 1928 Ford Model A, to the show.

The car travels about 40 miles a day, and like many of the cars at the show, attracts lots of attention in parking lots.

“I just love the way people react to it,” he said.

Adorned with metal bugs and cheeky phrases such as “No airbags, I’ll die like a real man,” building the car was a project where the metal artist could showcase his welding skills and eye for recycling.

He started working on the car in 2009, and while it’s been finished for a while, as you likely expect, it requires constant maintenance.

mshinn@durangoherald.com

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